Story Time in Norwalk

If you have been following our blog, you have noticed that September was a busy month for me as the Central Iowa Honey Queen. At the end of September, I visited the Norwalk Easter Public Library to do a story time.

This story time was really big. There were over fifty kids present with their adults. I started by introducing myself. Then I read the book Little Bee by Edward Gibbs.



Here I am reading the book Bee Dance by Rick Chrustowski.



After the story time, the kids got to roll a beeswax candle and color honey bee pictures.

Abigial

Visiting the Science Center of Iowa’s Preschool

Last September, I visited a class of preschoolers at the Science Center of Iowa. I read them books about honey bees, explained the bees life cycle, and showed them real bees in an observation hive. I also told them about the bees that live at the Science Center of Iowa.

Here I am teaching the kids about honey bee anatomy with my worker bee puppet, Abby.



In this picture, I am showing the kids a picture of a working bee fanning. Worker bees fan the air to reduce the temperature in the hive.



All the kids loved looking at the bees. Some of them were so interested in looking at the bees that they did not want to sit back down.



Sharing with the kids about bees was a lot of fun. They were super excited that the Science Center had its own bees and were eager to go find them.

Abigail

Visiting a School

Last September, I visited a local school to speak to the second, first, kindergarten, and preschool class. It was fun to create programs for four different age groups that still covered the same topics.

Here I am speaking to the second grade class. I told them all about the castes of honey bees, life cycle of honey bees, and how honey is made. The students were able to look at the bees in the observation hive and taste honey. These students had been learning about honey bees.



Here I am speaking to the first grade class. They had lots of questions. They were especially excited to get a honey stick.



Here I am reading the book Little Bee by Edward Gibbs to the kindergarten class.



I spoke to the preschool class right before they headed to lunch. I read them the book Little Bee by Edward Gibbs and Bee Dance by Rich Chrustowski.

This was my first school visit. I had spoken to students before at the AG4KIDS Day. I had never done a school visit though. I really enjoyed the students excitement for and stories about honey bees.

Abigail

Working the IHPA Booth at the Iowa State Fair

For the past few years, us girls have spent some time at the Iowa State Fair volunteering at the Iowa Honey Producers Association’s booth. 2019 was no different.

Before the State Fair, Mom, Miriam, Olivia, and I helped by folding shirts. Many of the shirts we folded were sold at the State Fair.



On the first day of the State Fair, Bethany and Miriam worked the candle rolling station.



I worked the observation hives. I was able to share about honey bees to fair -goers.



Olivia, not surprisingly, worked the sample table on the first day. Do you think she ate more samples than she handed out?



Bethany and I worked the second day of the State Fair. Bethany worked a cash register and I worked the candle rolling station.

On Monday of the State Fair, Bethany, Miriam, and Olivia worked the booth.

On Tuesday of the State Fair, Bethany filled cups with ice. These cups were then filled with the amazing honey lemonade.



On the second Thursday of the State Fair, I once again worked the candle rolling stations. All the money raised at the candle rolling station goes to the Honey Queen Program so that the honey queen can travel around the state to educate on honey bees, beekeeping, and the products of the hive.



Our friend, Joanna, was a 2019 IHPA Youth Scholarship Recipient. She worked the state fair on the second Thursday. She and Miriam were put in charge of selling honey lemonade.



On the second Friday, I once again worked the candle rolling station.



Bethany and Olivia sold honey lemonade.



We enjoyed working the booth, meeting new people, and hanging out with friends.

Abigail

Presenting at the Iowa State Fair

Throughout the Iowa State Fair, I was able to give five presentations and assist with six presentations.

The very first day of the Iowa State Fair I presented on beeswax. Olivia helped by dressing up as the Buzz the Bee.



I was able to promote Iowa honey, beeswax products, and other beehive products in my presentation. I also answered questions from the audience.



Olivia dressed up as Buzz the Bee for every presentation she could.



On Monday of the State Fair, I presented my Helping Honey Bees presentation in the 4-H building. I received a Certificate of Merit for my presentation.



On Tuesday of the State Fair, the 2019 American Honey Queen, Hannah Sjostrom, visited. I interviewed on The Big Show with her. She led a cooking with honey presentation and a basics of honey bees presentation. The North Iowa Honey Queen, Veronica, and the Iowa Honey Queen, Brooklyn, also assisted Hannah.



Here is Hannah giving her honey bee presentation. Hannah used the teaching tools to tell a story about the making of honey.



I explained what a beekeeper’s tools are and how they are used.



It was a privilege to meet Hannah and learn from her. (Left to right in the picture below are Bethany, Veronica, Hannah, myself, Brooklyn, and Olivia in the front)



On Wednesday, I assisted the Friendly Beekeepers of Iowa Honey Queen, Emma, with two cooking with honey demonstrations. Emma writes regular cooking with honey articles in the Iowa Honey Producers Association’s newsletter.

On the second Thursday of the State Fair, I assisted the State Apiarist, Andy Joseph, with a presentation. Mom and Dad were at the State Fair and stopped by for the presentation.

On the second Friday of the State Fair, I presented my Helping Honey Bees presentation.

My final presentations were on the final Saturday of the State Fair. I led two honey bee story times with help from the Southwest Iowa Honey Queen, JoAnn and a fellow beekeeper. After leading story times, state fair-goers were able to play honey bee themed games and do honey bee themed crafts. We, of course, handed out lots of honey sticks.

Presenting at the Iowa State Fair was a great opportunity for me to educate about honey bees, beekeeping, and the products of the hive while growing as a speaker. I learned from my fellow honey queens as well.

Abigail

Adding a Queen to the Science Center of Iowa’s Observation Hive

In 2019, the Science Center of Iowa started a honey bee exhibit. The exhibit started out with one observation hive. Because beekeeping is such a specialized skill, the Science Center wanted to have a volunteer beekeeper to work with the bees. Mom and I are the main volunteer beekeepers for the Science Center, but Bethany and Olivia often help.

When I first visually inspected the observation hive, I noticed that they were queenless. The Science Center employ in charge of the exhibit ordered a new queen and we installed her in late July. In the picture below, we are deciding where to put the queen cage.



Here I am pressing the queen cage into the bottom frame where most of the bees are. I was careful to make sure she could still get out.



The worker bees quickly smelled the queen’s pheromones and started accepting her.



We closed the observation hive. The bees on top of the cage had to move out of the way.



The bees accepted this queen and started building up for winter. It was interesting working with an observation hive.

Abigail

2019 Warren County Fair

On July 26th, Bethany and I volunteered at the Friendly Beekeepers of Iowa booth at the Warren County Fair. We spent the day sharing about honey bees with fair-goers.

The Friendly Beekeepers of Iowa had an observation hive with bees in it at their booth. This gave me a great opportunity to help people find the queen, spot brood, and see real honey comb.



Bethany also used the observation hive to educate about honey bees.



The booth also had a real honey vs. fake honey taste test, honey bee quiz game, and posters about honey bees. I learned that another name for a worker bee’s pollen basket is corbicula. Bethany and I loved the opportunity to educate about honey bees.

Abigail

Iowa Honey Producers Association’s Booth at RAGBRAI 2019

On July 23rd, Olivia and I worked the Iowa Honey Producer Association’s (IHPA) booth at RAGBRAI. RAGBRAI is an event were cyclist cycle across the state. There are selected stops across the way. One of the stops was at Howell’s Greenhouse and Pumpkin Patch. The IHPA booth had a observation hive, educational hand outs, and honey lemonade!

Before the cyclist started arriving, we helped tape together honey styxs.



Olivia showed cyclist’s where the queen was in the observation hive. I also enjoyed using the observation hive to educate cyclists.



This event was a great opportunity for me to represent my club.



Howell’s Greenhouse and Pumpkin Patch has goats! Olivia got in the pen with them and played with them before we left. Good thing she did not come home with one.



It was a lot of fun for us to share our love of honey bees with people from all around the county.

Abigail

East Side Library Hive Inspection Presentation

On July 2nd, I gave a Hive Inspection Presentation at the East Side Library as the CIBA Honey Queen. First, I introduced myself. Then I explained what a beekeeper wears when inspecting. I explained that different beekeepers will wear different amounts of protection.

Next I explained a beekeeper’s tools. In the picture below, I am pretend smoking the hive entrance. A beekeeper smokes the bees to calm the bees down and mix up their attack pheromones.

East Side Hive Inspection - July 2nd, 2019


After I removed the outer cover and inner cover, I explained the difference between a super and a deep. A super is where the honey bees store the honey and the deep is where the honey bees raise the brood. In this picture, I am removing the super so that I can “inspect” the deep.

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Here I am showing a real frame that has honey in it. I also showed a frame that shows the life cycle of honey bees. Finally, I talked about how the bottom board is the bees entrance.

East Side Hive Inspection - July 2nd, 2019 (3)


After my presentation, all the kids and adults were able to make a rolled beeswax candle. This picture shows all the colors they got to choose from.

East Side Hive Inspection - July 2nd, 2019 (4)


Here are some of the kids making a candle. This craft is a favorite wherever I do it. Everyone also got to plant pollinator friendly seeds to take home.

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This was such a fun program.

Abigail

Abigail’s Clive Presentation

On June 18th, I gave a presentation about honey bees and beekeeping to a day camp group in Clive.

First, I taught the kids about honey bee anatomy. I did 6-5-4-3-2-1 Honey
Bee Anatomy. A honey bee has six legs, five eyes, four wings, three body parts (head, thorax, and abdomen), two antennae and stomachs, and one stinger and proboscis.

Next, I talked about the honey bee castes (the queen, the drone, and the worker bee). I talked about how the queens only job is to lay eggs and how she can lay up to 2000 eggs a day. I explained that the drones only job is to mate with the queen. Worker bees, of course, do all the work in the hive. They clean the hive; feed the brood, queen, and drones; build beeswax; collect nectar; and much more.

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Next, I talked about the life cycle of a honey bee. All honey bees are eggs for three days before hatching and becoming larvae. On day nine the larvae is capped and becomes a pupae. If the bee is a queen, she emerges from her cell on day sixteen. If the bee is a drone, he emerges on day twenty-four. If the bee is a worker bee, she emerges on day twenty-one.

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Fourth, I showed the kids how a beekeeper inspect his/her hive. I told them why a beekeeper wears protective clothes and why a beekeeper uses a smoker. I told them what a beekeeper looks for when inspecting a hive.

Finally, I read the book Bee Dance. Then the kids acted out the the waggle dance by finding paper flowers Mom had hidden then coming back to the shelter and doing the waggle dance. I had the oldest kids be foragers first because older bees are the foragers in the hive. One boy found a dandelion and led his friend to it.

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The kids were particularly curious to know if bears were a major threat to honey bees. I told them that we do not normally have wild bears in Iowa then explained that humans sometimes hurt honey bees more by killing them with pesticides.

This was a fun program to do. The kids were very attentive for the length the program was.

Abigail